"The Night The Dark The Grasshopper and You" is Mircan Kaia's first book. It is perhaps as hard an endeavor to categorize the book she wrote as it is hard to categorize her music. The book can be called a novella. The author presents a century long epoch in a hundred or so pages. This is a story of a child bride who was not aware of the plots behind her marriage and forced to become a woman too early. She connects pieces together with short stories which are presented under different chapters. After a span of two weeks which she spent with her mother atop the mountain village she was born in, in a wooden house, picking off the story from her mother's bosom, the author goes on a journey in her mother's memory and becomes her voice to confess in her stead. A kind of return to the womb and an affirmation of all flaws. An attempt to look into another's pain, to see from her perspective, to become her voice, to interpret her feelings.A realistic point of view is embraced in this century long tale in which we can also find the tracks of a pagan living tradition that is undoubtedly present anywhere ruled by nature, and Mircan Kaia lets us feel through her writing the bitter sweetness also present in her music.At the last chapter "The Night The Dark, The Grasshopper and You", which is also the namesake of the book itself, we might find ourselves crying together with the author, but as always, Mircan Kaia elevates love and life in this last chapter.First published in Turkish in Turkey as paperback book, "The Night The Dark The Grasshopper and You" is available now for English readers.

The Night The Dark The Grasshopper And You

SKU: UCM 272957-10
€14.00Price
  • Each book is delivered with a bookmarker designed and signed by Mircan Kaya 

     

WHAT PEOPLE SAY

“Mircan Kaya is freed by her day job as an engineer to pursue her music with a singular vision. Her voice ranges from etheral to dutsy, through pain and joy, always true to some deep and wise river of sound that flows through her to our ears. INSULA may be the deepest yet.” 

 

Atesh Sonneborne, Smithsonian Institution